Praying in Church with Sign Language

Praying in Church with Sign Language

“So… how about sign language? The good folks at St. Gregory of Nyssa in San Francisco have passed on to us their resources for using sign American language during traditional Episcopal worship services.”

 

Embodied Faith
Christianity has always been an “embodied” faith. The inherent value of the material world is established in the creation narrative and then affirmed in the incarnation of God in Jesus Christ. Human bodies (these strange fleshy vessels) are of great value – so much so that God was enfleshed within a body.

A central theme throughout centuries of Christian theology has been a strong stance against gnosticism. Gnosticism proposes, among other claims, that the material world is something we must escape. Human bodies, according to Gnostics are… unfortunate, to put it mildly.

Christians beg to differ. And so it is that when we use our bodies in worship, we make a theological claim. Flesh can be good! Of course, in this world we will always fall short (sin), but as we offer our bodies in service to God, we get a glimpse of God’s ultimate intention. And that intention is good!

Sign Language in Church
So… how about sign language? The good folks at St. Gregory of Nyssa in San Francisco have passed on to us their resources for using sign American language during traditional Episcopal worship services.

Check out their videos here. You can learn (and teach others) how to sign the prayers like the Sanctus (Holy, Holy, Holy), and other songs or parts of scripture.

What an extraordinary way to live out an embodied faith – in worship!

Here is the Sanctus video:

 


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