The Golden Rule Around the World

The Golden Rule Around the World

“The Golden Rule has its roots in a wide range of world cultures, and is a standard which different cultures use to resolve conflicts.”

 

 

The Golden Rule is an ethic of reciprocity, an ethical code that in essence states, “One should treat others as one would like others to treat oneself.”

Some might say The Golden Rule is arguably the most essential basis for the modern concept of human rights, in which each individual has a right to just treatment, and a responsibility to ensure justice for others. A key element of the Golden Rule is that a person attempting to live by this rule treats all people with consideration, not just members of his or her in-group. The Golden Rule has its roots in a wide range of world cultures, and is a standard which different cultures use to resolve conflicts.

 

Norman Rockwell’s “The Golden Rule”

 

Christianity: All things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye so to them; for this is the law and the prophets. Matthew 7:1

ConfucianismDo not do to others what you would not like yourself. Then there will be no resentment against you, either in the family or in the state. Analects 12:2

Buddhism: Hurt not others in ways that you yourself would find hurtful. Udana-Varga 5,1

HinduismThis is the sum of duty; do naught onto others what you would not have them do unto you. Mahabharata 5,1517

IslamNo one of you is a believer until he desires for his brother that which he desires for himself. Sunnah

JudaismWhat is hateful to you, do not do to your fellowman. This is the entire Law; all the rest is commentary. Talmud, Shabbat 3id

TaoismRegard your neighbor’s gain as your gain, and your neighbor’s loss as your own loss. Tai Shang Kan Yin P’ien

ZoroastrianismThat nature alone is good which refrains from doing another whatsoever is not good for itself. Dadisten-I-dinik, 94,5

 

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